Thursday, January 8, 2009

Changing Dubai


Dubai is changing. A cursory look at blogs and reports indicate that the global slowdown is indeed having an impact. Earlier, the common subject for discussion on the streets used to be rising rents and traffic jams, but now project delays and layoffs have become hot topics. Quite a few people have lost jobs, especially in the real estate and banking sectors. Some motorists are expressing happiness that the traffic flow is smooth on the roads. A friend told me that hotel occupancy rate is not encouraging, but there is another version denying this. All this talk of job loss makes one sad. Many expats work round the clock to help their families back home. One should see their struggle for survival to understand the reality. The flashing of gold chains and electronic gadgets give an impression back home that expats have it easy all through. But that is hardly the truth. I am happy with one development, though. Taxi drivers used to be rude and rough just a couple of months ago. Now, their business hit hard, they salute the customers and talk with respect. Natural justice! With rents going through the roof, my next prayer is for a tight lesson for greedy builders.

13 comments:

tantra flower said...

This makes me so sad. My heart and well wishes go out to those who have lost their jobs and the business owners forced to make those hard choices to let people go. Times are tough for human beings everywhere.

Hardship does offer an incredible opportunity for spiritual growth and gratitude. I'm happy that some taxi drivers are now appreciating their customers.

Maria said...

Oh I agree with tantra flower. I also hope that pleople will appreciate more what they have, and I feel very sorry for those losing their jobs.
Here in Vienna, a General Motors work has set its 1.600 employees on reduced working hours. But things like that seem to ge only the beginning of harder times.

Mahalakshmi said...

A fair and a noble thought indeed! - Maha mami:-)

Aviral said...

i saw your new profile photo...is that the burj-al-arab in the background?

R. Ramesh said...

Thanks 4 yr valuable comment, Maha mami

Mridula said...

When I drive in the morning to the office I hear a lot of advertisement about Dubi Shopping Festival. I wonder if people living here also bother about it?

Sorry this is completely off topic but I thought I would ask you!

humanobserver said...

I am agree with Tantras' words...My best withses are with those who lost their jobs...Even In India, it has already begun in various sectors...In between, I loved your new layout....

Braja said...

Hi yourself :)

Good points..but as Tantra Flower said, hardship offers the opportunity for spiritual growth..who will take it?

Braja said...

How do I find the Sharjah daily online?

Nikki said...

It just gets worse! Thanks for stopping by at our Mumbai blog!

Himanshu said...

natural justice! I like that..wish something like this happens with auto waalahs of Pune...brr..
he he..

Anyway, am as usual stumbling and somehow keeping up with my studies..so less chances to go to mumbai..or delhi either..keep visiting.. :)

Anonymous said...

Well said Ramesh..it certainly is sad to see people forced out of this country but let's look on the bright side: less traffic, lower prices and, most importantly, HUMBLE taxi drivers!
your colleague...guess who!! =)

KK Moidu said...

ya, taxi drivers turned polite and now they are ready for taking passengers to any busy area. We can't blame them because when they are in demand they thought it will remain forever.
Many leaders and top officials also realise the realities after a downfall. When they can really do something they will never do anything except for their favourite, even if they were grown up by facing the same situation.
However, traffic rush is also reduced in UAE roads and a dubai radio presenter, who used to give the traffic updates [sponsored by Gargash Insurance] on air was surprised or disappointed because she didn't have any traffic update or accidents for airing upto today afternoon.